Thursday, 11 June 2015

Rule #210: Trophy Hunting

 Personally, I don't get the whole hunting thing in general. Why would you want to sit in a blind for hours on end or trek through the bush just so you can put a bullet in a defenseless animal and slice it's throat? It seems much less labor intensive to go to the grocery store and buy food without getting blood all over yourself. The grocery store is climate controlled, well lit and it doesn't take a lot of hunting to get the odd hot chick sighting. Hunting is not for me, but if you're hunting moose or turkey or
whatever, for the sake of personal consumption I guess it's the same as having a slaughter house do it. Actually, it's probably a lot better knowing exactly what you're eating as opposed to all the crap that's put in our food. However, you can save the B.S. about having to hunt to save money. Licensed hunters spend $1.8 billion on hunting-related equipment in the U.S. and it's estimated that after license fees, equipment, and travel expenses, it costs an average of $20 per pound for a deer hunter to put venison on the table. And how many hunters do you think tend vegetable gardens?

 Sport or trophy hunting, on the other hand, is a totally different animal (pun intended). Hunters often claim that hunting is a sport involving fair chase. Fair sport involves two individuals on equal grounds who
have a mutual agreement to engage in the activity. If we were to make it fair to both parties, we'd have to give the animals guns too. I'd say it's about as fair as a UFC fight between Brock Lesnar and Steve Bennett. I've heard people justify hunting trips to Africa by saying the meat gets donated to the locals. Whatever dude. If you have the means to execute a trip around the world to kill an animal and are really concerned about the locals, go there and help build a school or purify some water or something. Or take a picture of an animal. I'd much rather see a picture of a zebra running in it's natural habitat than see a zebra head staring at me from above your fireplace. Trophy hunting serves one purpose. I can only assume people do this for the apparent pleasure of stalking and killing.



In the new world, sport hunting will be outlawed unless the animals sign an agreement to engage and are given the same weapons as the hunters.

AND SO IT SHALL BE WRITTEN!

10 comments:

  1. I'm definitely with you there!
    Cheers, ic

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  2. Right on brother. Welcome to the new world!

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  3. I have no problem with hunters who put meat on the table for their families. In GA, hunting licenses are what fund the wildlife management areas, the few untouched places in the state. The hunters I know have a deep connection with Nature, and are stewards of the land (in the same vein as native Americans), much more so than the average citizen. I'm not sure if the $20/lb deer processing quote is accurate, but when you consider the cost in terms of CO2 footprint, hunters have much smaller ones than farm-raised meat, so maybe it averages out. I get my venison free from friends of mine. On the other hand, trophy hunting is about killing for the sake of killing, and I don't understand it at all.

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    1. You know who else keeps trophies of their kills? Serial killers.

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  4. I'm a hunter. I enjoy sitting out in the woods waiting for the deer to come lurking by. Its quiet and stress free. I hunt to feed my family. I skin and cut up the meat myself and my grandpa even reloads all of my bullets. The prices of meat these days are getting ridiculous. $10 for a steak a the grocery store.. and its hard to tell exactly what is in the meat other than meat.
    Sitting out in the woods, having the satification of providing for my family, teding to all the preperations myself is very rewarding.

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    1. I'm jealous that you get your meat chemical free. The closest I'll ever get to hunting is hunting down a deal on a good tenderloin. These trophy hunters, on the other hand. That's a different breed.

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  5. If you want to take the easy way out use a crossbow.Crossbow is really impressive equipment for hunting but one has to use a good rifle scope to do the task.My boy will love it, He’s looking forward to hunting soon. It will give him practice.

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  6. I think the best first step for a beginner hunter would be to attend a hunter education course, sometimes known as a hunter safety course. For more information on this, check out introduction to hunting from the International Hunter Education Association (IHEA). This should help you understand more about hunting, hunters, and the wildlife we pursue.

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  7. That other, and all important factor in accurate field shooting is range picture. All skilled game shots, hunting anything from squirrel to moose, must have a range picture in reference to their rifle and target. Navigate to this website

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  8. Maybe one of the eldest exercises on the substance of the planet is hunting.Taxidermy near me

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Agree? Disagree? Lay it on me!