Wednesday, 16 December 2015

Rule #22: Dealing with dementia


Dementia affects more than 35 million people worldwide, a number that is expected to nearly double every two decades. Health ministers from G8 countries are pledging to find a treatment or cure for the brain disease by 2025.
Those afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia often find it difficult to maintain what are considered normal daily activities. Remembering simple tasks such as writing a single paragraph in a blog article becomes difficult to remember.
Those afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia often find it difficult to maintain what are considered normal daily activities. Remembering simple tasks such as writing a single paragraph in a blog article becomes difficult to remember.
Once again I find myself as frustrated as a Mennonite electrician. It all comes down to diet and exercise - again. You see it in almost every article written about this disease. Yet what are we doing about it? Well I'm not the one to ask because I spend most nights drinking wine and beer and eating chips. Basically contributing to my own dementia. But I don’t remember learning about any of this in school – maybe because of my own dementia or inability to pay attention. It seems all the focus is on a cure. 15 gazillion dollars spent on finding a cure for a largely preventable disease. I say revamp early education by replacing useless crap like poetry with education about disease prevention. Understanding the risks of your actions is imperative.
Cardiovascular risk factors: Anything that damages blood vessels anywhere in your body can damage blood vessels in your brain, depriving brain cells of vital food and oxygen. You can help protect your brain with some of the same strategies that protect your heart – don't smoke and take steps to keep your blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar within recommended limits; and maintain a healthy weight.
Physical exercise: Regular physical exercise may help lower the risk of some types of dementia. Evidence suggests exercise may directly benefit brain cells by increasing blood and oxygen flow to the brain.
Diet: What you eat may have its greatest impact on brain health through its effect on heart health. The best current evidence suggests that heart-healthy eating patterns, such as relatively little red meat, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, fish and shellfish, and nuts, olive oil and other healthy fats.
It’s time we started putting a bigger emphasis on teaching prevention in schools and at the doctors’ office.

In the new world, there will be more focus on health in the education system.

AND SO IT SHALL BE WRITTEN!

2 comments:

  1. Love it, pump those kids full of life knowledge that they'll actually need. Even scare them with the effects of what can happen when you choose to live unhealthy. Then teach them about the value of a dollar and how to pick a good mortgage. School of life!!!

    ReplyDelete

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